Timely diagnosis and improved treatment strategies for athletic hip injuries lead to faster recovery

Timely diagnosis and improved treatment strategies for athletic hip injuries lead to faster recovery

ROSEMONT, Ill. (April 6, 2017)—There are many health benefits to being an athlete. However, the sudden body movements used in sports like football, hockey, and basketball can lead to painful hip injuries. A new literature review in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS) identifies treatment strategies to get athletes back in the game.

Hip injuries account for 6 percent of all sports injuries. A timely diagnosis can improve an athlete’s treatment and recovery; however, it can be difficult to pinpoint the specific source of the pain because it can radiate to different parts of the hip. Over the years, medical practitioners have improved diagnosis of these injuries through physical examination and imaging scans. As a result, they have been able to develop disease-specific treatments to help athletes return to their sports activities as soon as possible.
“Athletic hip injuries are an ever-increasing issue in our athletic population,” said lead study author T. Sean Lynch, MD, an orthopaedic sports surgeon and assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery at Columbia University Medical Center. “Previously, these used to be debilitating and potentially career-threatening conditions, but over the last 10 to 15 years, our recognition of these injuries has improved, as well as our ability to manage them.”
Physicians treating patients with athletic hip injuries should:
   

 

 

 
“Treating athletic hip injuries requires a multidisciplinary approach, not only with orthopaedic surgeons but also with physical therapists, physiatrists, radiologists, and general surgeons in order to treat the whole patient,” explains Dr. Lynch. “When appropriately managed, these athletes can successfully return to play.”
 
 
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Disclosures
 
From Columbia Orthopaedics, the Center for Shoulder, Elbow and Sports Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (Dr. Lynch), the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, MedSport,University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (Dr. Bedi), and the Minnesota Orthopedic Sports Medicine Institute at Twin Cities Orthopedics, Edina, MN (Dr. Larson). Dr. Bedi or an immediate family member serves as a paid consultant to Arthrex; has stock or stock options held in A3 Surgical; and serves as a board member, owner, officer, or committee member of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. Dr. Larson
or an immediate family member serves as a paid consultant to Smith & Nephew and A3 Surgical; has stock or stock options held in A3 Surgical; and has received research or institutional support from Smith & Nephew. Neither Dr. Lynch nor any immediate family
member has received anything of value from or has stock or stock options held in a commercial company or institution related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article.
 

Contact(s):
Kayee Ip
phone: 847-384-4035
email: ip@aaos.org

Kelly King Johnson
phone: 847-384-4033
email: king@aaos.org