News

July 22, 2014

Activity level may predict orthopaedic outcomes, especially in younger, more athletic patients

ROSEMONT, Ill.—According to a literature review in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS), patients’ activity level is a strong predictor for how well they will do with certain treatments and how well they recover from injuries after treatment. Patients are encouraged to ask their orthopaedic surgeon if activity level is an important factor in their treatment decision. For example, more active patients are at a higher risk of re-injury after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, and activity level should be considered when deciding which graft to use in the ACL repair.

 


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2014 Safe and Accessible Playground

Hundreds of orthopaedic surgeons gathered at Arthur Ashe Charter School, a FirstLine School, in New Orleans to build a Safe and Accessible playground in just one day!

Visit aaos.org/playground for information on how you could help make the 2015 Safe and Accessible Playground Build in Las Vegas possible.

2014 AAOS Diversity Award: Robert D. D'Ambrosia, MD

Robert D. D'Ambrosia, MD, is honored with the 2014 AAOS Diversity Award for his commitment to practicing and promoting culturally competent care, providing care to underserved patient populations, and recruiting, training, and mentoring female and ethnically or racially diverse medical students and residents.
 
Dr. D'Ambrosia is a past AAOS President and a Professor of Orthopedics at the University of Colorado where he also worked on the School of Medicine's Diversity Policy that helped increase student diversity to 9%. With the underserved Mexican and Native American patient populations Colorado offers, Dr. D'Ambrosia embraces the opportunity to treat these patients with culturally competent care and works diligently to reduce
the healthcare disparities they face. He was also pivotal in ensuring that the University of Colorado sports medicine faculty includes female practitioners to help address the needs of female sports teams.
 
Prior to his achievements in Colorado, Dr. D'Ambrosia's service to the Louisiana State University Department of Orthopaedic Surgery spanned over 30 years. While Chair of the Department, he trained and mentored more than 100 LSU graduates. His contributions to the LSU program are so long-lasting, a lectureship and chair have been established in his
honor.
 
For more information about Dr. D'Ambrosia and the AAOS Diversity Award, visit aaos.org/awards.

2014 AAOS Tipton Leadership Award: Gary E. Friedlaender, MD

Gary E. Friedlaender, MD, current Wayne O. Southwick Professor and Chair of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation at Yale University School of Medicine, and Chief at Yale-New Haven Hospital, is the honoree of the ninth annual William W. Tipton, Jr. MD Leadership Award for his work as a researcher, mentor, educator, and leader. Established by friends, colleagues, and partner organizations through AAOS and the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation (OREF), the Tipton Award honors the qualities exemplified by the late Dr. Tipton, including commitment to mentorship, diversity, bridge-building, and collaboration.

Dr. Friedlaender is amongst the longest serving orthopaedic chairs in the country. He has educated generations of orthopaedic surgeons who have gone on to significant leadership positions, reflecting his stature as a master teacher and role model in orthopaedics. Dr. Friedlaender has served as President of the American Orthopaedic Association (AOA), the Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS), the Academic Orthopaedic Society (AOS), the Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons (ABJS), the American Association of Tissue Banks (AATB), and the American Council on Transplantation (ACT), as well as having chaired the AAOS Council on Musculoskeletal Specialty Societies and Committee on Research.
 
Dr. Friedlaender chaired the National Arthritis Board (NIAMS/NIH) and is the recipient of Kappa Delta Award (AAOS/ORS) and Nicholas Andre Award (ABJS) for his research.
 
For more information about Dr. Friedlaender and the AAOS Tipton Leadership Award, visit aaos.org/awards.

2014 AAOS Humanitarian Award: Scott C. Nelson, MD

Scott C. Nelson, MD, of Linda Loma, Calif., is the honoree for the AAOS 2014 Humanitarian Award for having distinguished himself through outstanding musculoskeletal-related humanitarian activities.
 
Ever since Dr. Nelson's first trip to the Dominican Republic with his wife more than 10 years ago, the couple decided that is where they needed to be. For five years, he served as medical director and orthopaedic surgeon at CURE International Children's Orthopaedic Hospital in Santo Domingo providing healthcare to the underserved.
 
"While younger than the other [Humanitarian] Award winners, he has already served more than most manage in a lifetime," said John E. Herzenberg, MD of the 42-year-old candidate devoted to full-time charity work, offering orthopaedic services otherwise unavailable to those with limited resources.
 
When Dr. Nelson learned of the devastating Haiti earthquakes in January 2010, he quickly assembled a team, packed up his family, chartered a plane, and arrived in Port au Prince to assist with relief efforts two days later.
 
Dr. Nelson was one of the first orthopaedists to respond to the disaster in Haiti and has since, as of May 2010, performed or supervised over 600 operations and 3,000 closed fractures. He served as the full-time relief medical director at Hospital
Adventiste d'Haiti, working seven days a week, while developing an orthopaedic program and extending his service for an unplanned additional six months.
 
Dr. Nelson and family returned stateside in July 2010. As a full-time faculty member with an academic practice at Loma Linda University, he continues to take month-long unpaid leaves of absence to Haiti and the Dominican Republic to provide orthopaedic care to those with limited resources.
 
For more information about Dr. Nelson and the AAOS Humanitarian Award, visit aaos.org/awards.

Lazy Bones

Throughout America, entire families are backsliding. We're no longer sedentary, we're stationary. And that's bad news for your bones.

If you want strong bones, you have to use them! Bone is a living tissue that constantly reforms based on the everyday stress placed on it. And, the bone mass gained through healthy diet and physical activity during childhood helps determine how health bones will be throughout life.

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) urges you and your famliy to Get Up! Get Out! Get Moving!

For more information on bone health, visit OrthoInfo.org.
What would you do if a runaway car smashed your plans to walk down the aisle?

What would you do if a runaway car smashed your plans to walk down the aisle?

Eight months after his limb-threatening accident, Ari’s march down the aisle was a testament to what patient determination — and advanced orthopaedic surgery — can achieve. Go, Ari.

Read Ari’s story and find your own inspiration at ANationInMotion.org.
TEKGROUP International, Inc.

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