Don’t let a basketball injury bench you

Don’t let a basketball injury bench you

ROSEMONT, Ill. (May 1, 2018)–Participating in a friendly game of basketball is a fun way to exercise while enjoying your favorite sport. Whether playing recreationally or professionally, this fast-paced sport provides a full body workout helping to build muscle strength and bone density. However, one foul play can lead to painful injuries of the foot, ankle or knee.
 
According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), in 2016, emergency departments, doctors’ offices and clinics treated Before the next game of basketball, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) encourages players to consider safety tips to reduce their risk of injury and stay in the game.
 
EXPERT ADVICE
“Foot and ankle injuries are the most common injuries in basketball,” said AAOS spokesperson and orthopaedic sports medicine surgeon Matthew Matava, MD. “Non-contact twisting injuries to the knee and ankle while racing for the ball, coming down from a rebound, or defending an opposing player can lead to knee ligament and cartilage tears and sprained ankles. The risk for some of these injuries can be lowered by simply wearing the right shoes designed for basketball. Proper shoes with ankle support and good traction for basketball court surfaces are essential.”
 
The AAOS recommends the following basketball safety tips:
  For more basketball safety tips visit, OrthoInfo.org.
 
More Information about the AAOS
With more than 38,000 members, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is the world’s largest medical association of musculoskeletal specialists. The AAOS provides educational programs for orthopaedic surgeons and allied health professionals, champions and advances the highest quality musculoskeletal care for patients, and is the authoritative source of information on bone and joint conditions, treatments and related issues. 

Visit AAOS, at:
Newsroom.aaos.org for bone and joint health news, stats, facts, images and interview requests.
ANationinMotion.org for inspirational patient stories, and orthopaedic surgeon tips on maintaining bone and joint health, avoiding injuries, treating musculoskeletal conditions and navigating recovery.
Orthoinfo.org for patient information on hundreds of orthopaedic diseases and conditions.
Facebook.org/AAOS1
Twitter.com/AAOS1
Instagram/AAOS_1

Contact(s):
Kelly King Johnson
phone: 847-384-4033
email: king@aaos.org

Abby Watson
phone: 847-384-4036
email: watson@aaos.org