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March 03, 2016

Anterior versus posterior: Does surgical approach impact hip replacement outcomes?

ORLANDO, Fla.—The surgical approach to total hip replacement (THR)—either from the front of the body or the side/back (anterior versus posterior)—has no impact on outcomes six months after surgery, according to research presented today at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).
 
Total hip replacement is extremely common with more than 300,000 surgeries performed in the U.S. each year. Traditionally, most THRs have been done through a posterior approach, where the surgeon accesses the hip through the side or buttocks. More recently, anterior approach surgeries, where the surgeon enters the body through the front of the hip, have gained popularity. However, there remains a great deal of conflicting information as to which approach results in the best outcomes, in the least amount of time following surgery.
 
The new study involved 274 patients who underwent THR between June 2012 and August 2014 with a surgeon either exclusively performing a direct anterior approach to THR, or a surgeon exclusively performing a posterior approach. The average patient age was 65, and the average body mass index, 28 (a BMI ≥30 is considered obese). Using patient reported outcomes and Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcomes Scores, researchers compared the two groups of patients on pre- and post-surgical pain, other symptoms, function in daily living, function in sports and recreation, and hip-related quality of life.
 
There were no significant differences in outcomes between the two groups before or after surgery, according to the results.


“Both direct anterior and posterior surgical approaches for THR yield excellent, equivalent results as reported by patients,” said lead study author Mike Cremins, PhD, PA-C. “The surgical approach alone is not the singular variable that yields a difference in six-month postoperative outcome.”
 
“Patients considering THR should ask their orthopedic surgeon about the surgeon's surgical approach experience and preference,” said co-author and orthopaedic surgeon John Grady-Benson, MD. “A preoperative shared decison making discussion should always incorporate risks and potential benefits of any surgical approach to THR, as well as help patients understand what they can do before and after surgery to optimize outcomes.”

Study Abstract
 
View the 2016 AAOS Annual Meeting Disclosure Statements
 
The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
With more than 39,000 members, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) is the world’s largest association of musculoskeletal specialists. The AAOS provides education programs for orthopaedic surgeons and allied health professionals, champions and advances the highest musculoskeletal care for patients, and is the authoritative source of information on bone and joint conditions, treatments, and related issues.
 
Visit AAOS at:
Newsroom.aaos.org for bone and joint health news, stats, facts, images and interview requests.
ANationinMotion.org for inspirational patient stories, and orthopaedic surgeon tips on maintaining bone and joint health, avoiding injuries, treating musculoskeletal conditions and navigating recovery.
Orthoinfo.org for patient information on hundreds of orthopaedic diseases and conditions.
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Twitter.com/AAOS1
Contact(s):
Sheryl Cash
phone: 847-384-4032
Lauren Pearson Riley
phone: 847-384-4031
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